thinkinglazy

Talking about stuff!

On Writing: Revision Preperations

It has come to my attention that I have not been preparing for revision enough. Hell, I have not even been trying to learn how to do it write and in a structured way.

A few days ago while surfing Youtube, I came across an interesting video about editing your book. After watching it, I decided to start over and take notes, preparing some sort of checklist about how to edit.

The list, a group of simple errors to look for, so far goes as follows:

Error 1: shifting point of view in the middle of scene. EX: A character cannot know if their cheeks are red without seeing them.

Error 2: painting a scene without knowing whose point of view it is. Make sure it is made clear in the first two paragraphs, if not sentences.

Error 3: describing an experience that no one had. EX: Shouting that no one heard.

Error 4: a character thinking about themselves as a different person. No one thinks of themselves as ‘the boy’, rather ‘name’, ‘he’ or ‘I’.

Error 5: information dumps; when actions stop delivering the information mid action narration. Use different situations and organize them like a puzzle so reader could pick up and later feel proud about ‘getting it’. Did I stop my story to tell?

Error 6: the ‘as’ factor/cause and effect fallacy/order of events problem. In cause and effect, the effect does not follow the cause, as should be. EX: ‘He arched his back as electricity shot through his spine’, this should be, ‘electricity shot through his spine, making/causing his back to arch’.

Error 7: the ‘ing’ factor. Things that happen at the same time but should not. EX: ‘Battling as he drew his sword’. It is not possible to battle while drawing your sword, the latter is the prerequisite for the first.

Error 8: telling instead of showing. Vague adjectives without a visual. EX: Fierce is not a visual, drawing teeth is. Cold is not visual but shivering is. Use colors, textures, body language and visual explanation. Happy to be replaced by smiling, trotting, energetically moving. EX: ‘he was intrigued’ to ‘raised his eyebrows in intrigue’.

Exception: when trying to get to once scene from another it gets exhausting to show instead of telling.

Error 9: changing speakers with no new paragraph.

Error 10: speaker tags problem. You cannot smile, or signal a word, it has to come from a sound. Creative speaker tags make you sound like an idiot. Chirped, hissed, howled…etc. Those are only acceptable in fast action settings with no time for a dialogue because it does not slow down the pace.

Exception: pace is more important than speaker tag rules

Error 11: lack of use of invisible tags, (said and asked).

Error 12: Speaker tags at the end of the speeches used often. Put them at the beginning to try and notify the reader of who is talking.

Error 13: separating dialogue with a bead (description of actions) without a natural pause in the dialogue.

Error 14: foreshadowing something that is not used. Do not mention a weapon without having it being used.

PS: Person first said second is more common in adult books than in children books. It is an archaic method of writing, use it more in fantasy and less in other genres.

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oKw80FwZJU0

On Writing: Refining The Formula

I finally got some time to go on a writing bonanza and started working on the third part of my current five-part-book. I noticed that as I proceeded,my interests shifted and I forgot what message I originally wanted to send, even though I prepared the semi-detailed outline I previously mentioned, and where I wanted the story to go.

I came across another problem, the chapters started slowly loosing flow – not in terms of the story, but in terms of writing style – and it occurred to me that another formula was needed inside the one I originally followed.

Just to keep things updated, I will say a little about the format I loosely follow:

  1. I start with a ‘golden idea’, a unique message I want to send
  2. Then I move to the outlining of my 5-chapter part system, where each book is composed of parts consisting of five chapters each
  3. After the outline I move to the detailed outline of each part as I work on it, so its simply a module-based way of expanding the first outline that clearly states the goal, characters and obstacles for achieving this goal
  4. Then I start writing the part
  5. When I am done with the part,I start repeating steps (3) and (4) until the book is finished
  6. Finally, I revise the content and update it, trying to add small details I feel are relevant or delete ones not related to the story or of little value

But then I noticed over the past few days that the stories, while focusing on the goal and the general progression of the idea, lacks enough descriptive feel. In short, the story and dialogue proceeds just fine, albeit in a liner fashion of which I do not entirely approve, but the setting is becoming ignored.

I ended up having the last chapter composed of great, meaningful conversations that take place nowhere.

This made me realize that I need to further add to the general formula I have been using on an even smaller, more detailed level, that of each conversation and situation. Perhaps this is simply not my style, and I personally know that many people do not really care about the setting and just want to get the message, but still it bothers me that it is not yet coming to me as second nature.

Good luck and happy living.

On Writing: Songs and Poems

Now I know nothing about writing songs and poems, and whatever I know about writing in general is fairly limited, save for one thing: they are amazingly effective and keeping a story in mind.

For the past nine months I have been struggling to get any writing done due to time constraint. The one thing I noticed, however, was that I often had free time in no longer than 15-30 minute chunks. While this was not enough for me to write anything, for it takes me some time to get in the mood of writing and get my thoughts straight, it enough for me to write a verse or short song/poem about one of my stories. This did a good job of keeping it in mind and getting new ideas.

My current work in progress is a continuation of my series “Book of Kayal’ and reached a total of just under 30k words at the moment, about a third of its expected completed length, and I tried applying a new outlining method which, unfortunately, is not working very well for me. I found myself deviating from it lately, even more so when I started writing these little songs, and will have to go through several revisions of the outline by the time I am completed with the story. I cannot say if this is a better thing for the story in general or not, but it is certainly distracting me from progressing with it.

I will continue to keep you updated as something new comes about. Perhaps I will share one of my amateurish attempts at making a relevant song for one of my stories.

New Entrepreneur Blog

As promised, I have started a blog to test how much interest a book I intend to write will attract. It is about my experiences starting-up a small business, running it and shutting it down. It will develop in time to include more information and experiences. From now on there will be little/no new content about business.

There is the link: http://startupshareblog.wordpress.com/

 

On Business: Writing The Book

My apologies to all the followers who expected to hear more about my business but could not. To be perfectly honest, I was looking forward to sharing my knowledge, but was worried about compromising my business edge, which was clearly not a valid concern.

The good news, however, is that I have decided to prepare a book to share my experiences about starting up a business. Unlike other books, it will not be about success, but about failure and the lessons learnt from such a valuable experience. It is not a part of my life that I regret, rather one that fills me with pride.

I will start preparing an outline and start a new blog with weekly, I hope, updates about my progress to test how useful an interesting this experience is for others. You will be posted about the details later.

On Writing: Keeping Thoughts

As I have told you in the previous post, one of the largest problems facing me is keeping my stories in mind when I have no time to sit and write. Songs and poems were the first of my solutions and, so far, they have been not only keeping my story in mind, but also contributing to the generation of new ideas and motivating me to write.

I have been keeping a little purple book with me at almost all times and use it to jot down notes on any subjects that come to mind. One of the ideas that came to me today stemmed from a reflection on my past and future. I finally realized that what I really want to do in life is: contribute to the betterment of mankind in any way I can, even if the contribution is minimal.

Thus I believe that by using writing to reflect on my few experiences so far I could make a difference and, at the very least, entertain a few people. I am considering writing a book about my failed business, analyzing the possible mistakes at the same time.

PS: notice that there are very few books about failures and many about successes. Is it not possible that we stand to gain more from learning about failures?

On Writing: Getting in the Mood

So I haven’t been posting anything here in a month or two due to my abnormally busy schedule. I am starting to understand just how difficult it is for non-full-time writers to finish any of their work.

I’ve had a week off and used it to work on my fifth book, which had been left untouched for over a month. To my surprise, I found myself completely lost, both in terms of story and mood. It took me two days of rereading the chapters I write and fiddling with the outline to adjust it to my current mood, or perhaps to get into the mood which I intended to write with, and finally continue.

Writing a book while keeping the same general thoughts and emotions during the process is critical, I noticed, for the harmonious flow. Thus I suggest any writer to work on your book every day, or at least every other day, to keep doing progress in it and, most importantly, to keep it in mind and heart.

If I had not prepared an outline, the whole 15k words I wrote would have surely gone to waste.

Originum: The Seven Houses of Light

I was working on some lore for my fifth fantasy novel and decided to share it here. Let me know what you guys think.

The Seven Houses of Light were Salus’ main solution to battle the threat of corruption from external entities in Nosgard. After embarking on his quest, Deliverance, Salus, the Demigod Emperor Servak’s youngest son of two, realized that the agents of corruption are many and that they act as powerful forces to suppress the potential of Nosgard and its inhabitants.

Because the agents of corruption often worked in both hidden and revealed manners, Salus thought he should have plans to address both types of interference. The Seven Houses of Lights were established to, primarily, battle the type of corruption that requires no revealing, the ones who were acknowledged by the public to be a threat.

In order to strengthen the unity of Nosgard, a council of fourteen active members and one hidden member, initially Salus, was established. They would convene and decide on the path the Republic of Nosgard, formerly an empire, would take, peacefully and with mutual understanding.

Each house was formed by the official unity, usually marriage, of two opposite and distinguished Nosgardian individuals. These houses then would operate individually to generate money so they could finance whatever military, economic or developmental projects were required and decided upon to be in the benefit of Nosgard.

In return for their social status, the ruling families of the Seven Houses of Light were required to educate their children diligently and send them to roam the lands of Nosgard and beyond to learn as much as they can about it and its people. They were taught to become leaders with a strong sense of belonging, understanding and loyalty to the land.

Due to this condition, the Seven Houses of Light often lost many royal members during their dangerous education and endeavors, knows as The Pilgrimage; a risk dictated when they were first founded. The survivors of The Pilgrimage, however, became the pillars by which the Republic of Nosgard stood strong and the reason behind the continuous strengthening of the Seven Houses of Light.

In time, the Houses decided that the unity of Nosgard required a mutual goal, expansion, and began building armies to conquer the surrounding lands. The Eastern Charge was the first conquest sent to the Trakian Isles, and its soldiers were under the employ of the House of Egtahd.

Although the Seven Houses of Light were not affiliated to any city or ruler, only to the Republic of Nosgard, they were each located in a different city where they held their primary operations and responsibilities. Thus the Seven Houses of Light, in time, gained influence and loyalty from different cities, depending on their location. The House of Temperance, for example, was located in Gallecia and recruited most of its members from the city. There was, nevertheless, no rule or condition that they would adhere to recruiting and employing people from certain cities. Anyone was welcomed to join whatever House they wished, should the Houses be interested.

 

House Name City of Origin Insignia
First House of Temperance Gallecia The Eye
Second House of Egtahd Kol The Drop of Blood
Third House of Patienta Partha The Sand Dial
Fourth House of Tawda Alvissmal The Bowing Man
Fifth House of Naka Orkstad Isles The Veiled Maiden
Sixth House of Caritas Senna The Open Coin Purse
Seventh House of Godhet Estgard The Open Palm

 

On Awards: Liebster Blogging Award

I am not a hardcore blogger nor do I think that my ideas are worth of note, for I am mostly inspired by everyone around me, be it in virtually or else.

Winter Bayne (http://winterbayne.wordpress.com/) gave me a shout out for the Liebster Blogging Award – it is decorating the middle of this post.liebster-blog-award-2The process entails me to answer his 10 questions, then nominate 10 other bloggers with less than 200 followers, and present them with 10 questions of my own.

Thus the question answering begins.

  • Name 2 author sites you visit and why – I do not visit any author sites, I rarely have the time to do so, but I do watch Brandon Sanderson’s lectures on Youtube often. I find his way of taking the students through the writing process fairly useful. Sadly, though, I have never read any of his books.
  • Name 2 authors in the same genre as you. If you aren’t a writer  then 2 authors in your favorite reading genre –  I usually write fantasy (just until I reach my 1 million words mar), but since fantasy and sci-fi are usually grouped together, I will assume that both of them are one genre (or at least are very similar) and answer as such. Isaac Asimov is by far my favorite author. His process and way of delivering a message are phenomenal. It is from him that I derived the Golden Idea concept. The second, of course, is the same as every fantasy author’s favorite, Tolkien. He is, in m opinion, only second to Edgar Alan Poe in his writing style, but the idea that he practically invented modern fantasy makes him somewhat of my aspiring-writer inspiration.
  • What makes you bang your head against the keyboard? When a long day is finished and I feel that I want to write but can’t because I am too sleepy.
  • How did you get started Seriously, why did you write that novel? Or blog/business if not a writer –  I wrote my first novel, which I will never publish, because I was at a period in my life where work was slow and a hobby seemed a way to usefully invest my time in a relevant skill, writing.
  • How did you go about doing it (writing the novel for the first time or starting your online business)? It took me a month to finish my first novel, I was excited at the prospect of creating a world and placing its rules, and a lot of free time. Again, it was all possible because of a slow work pace.
  • What did you learn along the way? I learnt many things, but the most important, I think, so far is the ability to make meaning of things where none is provided; to see patterns hidden to others.
  • What’s your theme song? As in what song should start playing when you enter a room? Geneses’ I Can’t Dance.
  • What are you planning this month? I started my second semester preparing an MBA. I am pretty swarmed with work and readings.
  • What really inspires you? Knowing how little I know and how much I stand to learn. Growth is, I decided, my raison d’etre and learning, as I have discovered so far, is the best way to attain it.
  • What motivates you? The small things I notice in life that most of us, including me, take for granted.

As for the 10 bloggers I nominate, I will have to go back to the ones I try to follow as much as I can:

  1. Daniel Michaleski
  2. Joesephine L. Brooks

And these are, apparently, the only two I follow who meet the criteria. I will try to find some time to look for another eight and continue to forward this around.

On Writing: And Other Things

So I have been having a fair amount of stimulating discussions lately, and one of them was about the purpose of being (raison d’etre). The actual discussion I am referring to was not, however, about writing, but it resonated well when I generalized it to the craft.

This particular conversation, like most great ones, was held in a coffee-shop. A friend was interested in starting-up an innovative business related to the fashion industry. She kept talking to me about her idea and explained it in great detail, delving deep into many topics and concepts I had no idea about, but it all then eventually rippled up to one question.

She was reluctant about it, but had an untapped passion within her that was only kept hidden because of uncertainty, as most of us tend to do, and her main driver was not financial, rather it was social. She wanted to do something that would help others break free from social man-made bonds in a manner that was subtle, yet not to the extend of ineffectiveness.

Now, dear readers, I have discovered a common element found in all great writers (and entrepreneurs too), they write not to earn money or stroke their ego, but to change the world.

 

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